Allergen Calendar

The following allergens are currently in season.

Dust Mites

January - December
There’s no escaping dust mites – they’re a year-round problem all over the U.S. and the state of Texas. You’ll find them lurking in every corner of your house, behind the curtains, in your carpet, on your pets, and in your bed. Dust mite allergens are a common trigger of asthma symptoms and a major irritant for Texas allergy sufferers. Dust mites thrive in warm, humid environments such as bedding, upholstered furniture, and carpeting.

Grass

March - Mid-October
Grass pollen season in Texas begins in early March and doesn’t end until grasses stop releasing pollen in mid-October. As grass releases pollen into the air, the wind can carry it for miles on dry, sunny days. Pollen counts are usually lower on damp or cool days. Grass pollen is microscopic. Though you may not see it in the air, if you’re allergic to grass pollen, you may experience a reaction even to small amounts of it.

Mold Spores

January - December
Molds are another year-round problem affecting Texas allergy sufferers. Mold spores float in the air, much like pollen, increasing as temperatures rise in the spring. Symptoms of a reaction to mold allergies include sneezing, itching, congestion, runny nose and dry, scaling skin. Mold spores may enter the nose and cause hay fever symptoms, or trigger asthma if they reach the lungs. Indoor molds and mildew need dampness, and thrive in basements, bathrooms or anywhere with a leaky water source.

Pecan

Mid-March - June
Pecans: the official state tree of Texas. You’ll find pecan trees in the woods and orchards all over Texas. Though pecans are delicious in pies and other deserts, the pollen produced by pecan trees is second only to ragweed as a source of severe allergies. Peak time for pecan pollen release occurs from mid-March to late May, when it is spread all over the state by springtime winds.

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