December 5, 2016
Allergies

Five Things to Know About Cedar Fever

Without a doubt, the number one thing most people KNOW they’re allergic to is mountain cedar. It seems to be in a category all by itself. It’s the one thing that makes people dread the onset of winter. And while the weather hasn’t been showing it, we’re approaching winter quickly. Soon the sky becomes yellow and smoggy from the pollen in the air and sneezing and coughing are heard across the state. If you’re part of large population of people who suffer from cedar fever every winter, here are five things you need to know.

This cedar season could be exceptionally strong

We’re seeing a high amount of rain in Central and North Texas this year, and that means that mountain cedar will be blooming even stronger and longer this season. Start preparing now before cedar season begins.

Learn to avoid cedar pollen

As tempting as it is to drive around town with the windows down enjoying the brisk air-keep your windows closed. The same goes for when you’re home while keeping your living area clean and home dust-free.

Clean inside and outside

Have a Neti Pot and saline rinse ready to go for when you start feeling allergy symptoms. However, nasal passages aren’t the only places cedar pollen sticks. Get used to washing your face and changing clothes after being outside for a long period of time. Pollen from mountain cedar is built to stick and your sweaters and skin are perfect places for it to find a home.

Stock up on generic medicine now

It’s not uncommon to see the entire “Allergy” section of a drug store empty in December. Be prepared with sprays and antihistamines at home before your symptoms start.

Build a resistance to cedar

If you’re reading this, chances are you already know that mountain cedar affects you. Through immunotherapy, whether it be allergy drops or shots, you build a resistance to environment allergies. If you were to start immunotherapy now, you would already have a head start on achieving a significant amount of relief against your mountain cedar allergies next year.